2016: A Year (So Far) In Writing

Hi everyone. Sorry for my absence. It’s been quite a year so far, writing-wise. Even though I don’t feel like I’ve been doing a lot, there’s actually a good bit of writing with my byline on it from the last five months. As a way to kind of bring it all together, I’ve compiled a list of (just about) everything I’ve written since January 1.

Edmond Active Magazine

The bulk of my professional writing for the year has been published here, starting with Vol. 7, Issue 11 all the way up to this month.

  1. An interview with Perk Place co-owner Jeff Meyer
  2. An interview with artist Jerry Bergin
  3. An article about earthquakes from injection wells
  4. An interview with Oklahoma Geological Survey Director Jeremy Boak
  5. An article about Oklahoma’s wind power industry

I’m pretty proud of this stuff, if we’re being honest! The last few months have been a blur, and I’m working on more new content for them for the latter half of the year as we speak.

The Asexual Anarchist

This is my second full year as an asexuality blogger. I’m working on a little book of all the stuff I’ve written on asexuality as well as new things I haven’t yet gotten around to talk about. I haven’t posted quite as much content in 2016 as I want to, but there are still some good pieces. Here are some highlights.

  1. A post about recent ace “discourse” tomfoolery
  2. A post about what it means for me to be an “activist”

As we move through the rest of the year I’ll be posting more. Maybe. Probably.

Medium: The Illicit Popsicle

Okay, so this is where my shitposting and not-so-paranoid rants about Donald Trump have been going. There’s a LOT of quality work here, so this list is longer than the other two.

  1. Donald Trump defends his dick. I explain why
  2. On voting, and what you do after election night
  3. A review of Pokemon Yellow, oh and Men’s Rights Activists tried to “trigger” people
  4. Ben Shapiro and Michelle Fields left Breitbart because it became too far-right
  5. On Brussels
  6. Lol FUCK North Carolina (Oklahoma’s not much better at this point, tho)
  7. BABYMETAL is really fucking great, as it turns out
  8. Donald Trump is the GOP presidential candidate, and I indulge nihilistic dread as a result

I’m legitimately very pleased with my written output so far this year. Even though it’s scattered all over the damn place, the fact that I am still writing midway through 2016 is a good thing. I’ve gone several months without putting a single word down before, so I’m just happy that I’m consistent so far.

I’ve got some more articles in the works (Captain America is a Nazi now, and that’s shitty, so I’ll be writing about that), and I try to post somewhat regularly on Twitter still. I’m also doing a webcomic, which you can find here. It updates every Monday except for this last week.

‘Localore’ Public Radio Project Comes To Oklahoma, KOSU

Screen-Shot-2015-11-02-at-5.22.18-AM1-e1446463369221OKLAHOMA CITY — Today more than 15 public radio stations nationwide announced their partnership with Localore, a push by the Association of Independents in Radio (AIR) to pair independent radio producers with established public radio stations in an effort to create “new storytelling models with and for communities that public media doesn’t reach.”

KOSU, the NPR station for Oklahoma State University, is a participant in the program, and they are bringing in Allison Herrera, a veteran audio and video producer from Minnesota, to create “Invisible Nations,” a series set to explore “modern Native culture in Oklahoma,” according to Herrera’s biography page.

“My Invisible Nations project will connect KOSU and your listeners to the Native communities in greater Oklahoma,” Herrera said in an interview with KOSU’s Rachel Hubbard on Monday.

“Oftentimes, when we hear news about Native America, it’s really about tragedy, and loss, and hardship, and I think that public radio listeners deserve better, and they deserve to know more about the complexity of the lives of the people in Oklahoma that they’re really effected by, that their history is really interwoven with,” Herrera said.

Herrera’s team, and the 14 other Localore projects around the country, beat out nearly 200 other applicants.

Invisible Nations will begin production soon. You can visit their Facebook Page for more information about the project.


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New Texting While Driving Law May Not Be So Effective

FILE - In this May 5, 2015 file photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin,center, looks back at family members of Highway Patrol Troopers Nicholas Dees and Keith Burch after signing into law legislation that makes it illegal to text message while driving in Oklahoma, in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, May 5, 2015. Dees was killed and Burch was injured when they were struck by a vehicle on Interstate 40 in January 2015, whose driver was allegedly updating a social media page at the time. The law takes effect on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
FILE – In this May 5, 2015 file photo, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin,center, looks back at family members of Highway Patrol Troopers Nicholas Dees and Keith Burch after signing into law legislation that makes it illegal to text message while driving in Oklahoma, in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, May 5, 2015. Dees was killed and Burch was injured when they were struck by a vehicle on Interstate 40 in January 2015, whose driver was allegedly updating a social media page at the time. The law takes effect on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

OKLAHOMA CITY — November 1 in Oklahoma marks the beginning of a new regime: starting today, it is illegal to text or do anything on your phone while driving. Violators of this new law face a ticket of $100.

The goal of the law, ostensibly, is to reduce traffic accidents caused by distracted drivers more concerned with their phones than the road. Police intend to enforce the law “aggressively,” according to one news report. But what will actually change?

Acccording to the Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI), an organization that uses insurance data to track “the human and economic losses resulting from the ownership and operation of different types of vehicles,” possibly not much.

A 2013 bulletin from the HLDI reporting research done on two separate high-visibility anti-distracted-driving campaigns in Syracuse, NY and Hartford, CT found that there was no noticeable decrease in crash risk as a result of the campaigns. Additionally, a 2010 study of four states before and after bans on cell phone use while driving found that “there was no significant change in one state relative to comparison states and significant increases of 7-9 percent in three states. Increases in claim rates also were found for drivers 25 and younger in these three states.” Significantly, the HLDI maintains that “bans may not have a beneficial effect on crashes even with strong enforcement.”

What do you think about the new Oklahoma texting-while-driving law? Do you text while on the road? Let us know: theoklahomabreeze@gmail.com

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